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Carol Concerts and school nativity plays have been part of members’ Christmas preparations. Those still teaching have been busy organising them in

Christmas – Great Britain

Carol Concerts and school nativity plays have been part of members’ Christmas preparations. Those still teaching have been busy organising them in schools and those who have children and grandchildren have enjoyed attending them. In addition, two of our chapters have been celebrating the approach of Christmas with craft activities and buffet lunches.
Alpha Chapter members had a ‘Prepare for Christmas’ party in Holy Trinity Church Hall in London. They made some wonderful Advent wreaths and had a ‘Bring a dish’ shared lunch, with a glass of wine, which was much enjoyed by all. 

Gamma Chapter met at the home of Chapter President, Sandra Blacker, and were taught decoupage by two experts, who provided all the materials. Amidst a lot of chatter and laughter, members made some very good decoupage gifts,- getting very sticky in the process. Afterwards they shared a delicious buffet lunch. 

We collected money for our Schools for Africa project by the sale of books and gifts at our Christmas parties. Also, in lieu of sending each other Christmas cards, we donated the money we would have spent on cards and postage to our charity. Over the last few years this has become a tradition.


In Britain, we are very proud of our theatres and the many famous actors and actresses who grace our stages, many performing serious dramas throughout the year. However, at Christmas time our theatres become the venues for very different performances, - Pantomime. These are shows for all the family from small children to grandparents. They are usually based on traditional fairy tales, but with men playing women and women playing men. For example, in ‘Cinderella’, Prince Charming is traditionally played by a woman and the Ugly Sisters are played by men. Costumes are elaborate and often very funny. There are a lot of jokes, tricks, shouting out and singing, but the most important aspect is audience participation. If you have never seen a pantomime, you have missed something crazily British and a lot of fun. The day after Christmas, I will be seeing ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’ in Canterbury will all my family! We are all looking forward to it.

Sheila Roberts, EF Committee member for GB State

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moya - Útgáfa 1.13 2009 - Stefna ehf